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A minor in business is recommended for students interested in entering the fields of, or continuing their graduate studies in, accounting, business, economics, marketing or management. Knowledge gained will enhance the business side of any career one seeks.

Required courses:

ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I (3 credits)
Introduces basic accounting principles and preparation of financial statements. Focuses on understanding financial journals, ledgers, receivables, payables, inventory valuation, deferrals, accruals, plant assets, and debit/credit system. Explores internal controls, accounting ethics, and methods for evaluating financial information.
Prerequisite(s): None

ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II (3 credits)
Extends the application of basic accounting principles to partnership and corporate entities with an emphasis on the structure of corporate financial statements. Provides an overview of managerial accounting and the use of financial information in making decisions. Focuses on cost behavior, budgeting, performance evaluation, and the preparation and analysis of statements of cash flow and other advanced financial documents. Explores uses of technology and various software in the accounting process.
Prerequisite(s): ACC 101 (Principles of Accounting I)

ECO 112 Microeconomics (3 credits)
Overviews output and price theories of utility and demand, including production analysis and marginal product, and marginal costs, and pricing input factors, such as land, resources, wages, salaries, and the labor market. Also focuses on competition-perfect and imperfect oligopoly, monopoly regulation, and anti-trust policy, government policy and public choice, economic growth, international trade, and elements of risk and applied game theory.
Prerequisite(s): None

LAW 201 Business Law (3 credits)
Presents a broad introduction to the legal environment of business. Develops a basic understanding of contract law, torts, agency, and government regulation. Focuses on practical issues confronted in the business environment.
Prerequisite(s): None

MAR 301 Introduction to Marketing (3 credits)
Surveys the general concepts of marketing. Provides the basic knowledge to understand the “4 P’s” of marketing, consumer behavior, target markets, and web-based marketing. Introduces decision-making tools for integrating product, price, distribution, and communication decisions and processes into an organization competing in a global environment. Reinforces the applications of marketing terms to contemporary issues.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): None

MGT 301 Principles of Management and Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
Offers an introduction to management and organizational behaviors, explores the functions of management, group dynamics, and organizational structures, discusses how decisions are made effectively. Covers international organizational cultures and global perspectives of management.
Credit given for PSY 301 or MGT 301
Prerequisite(s): None

Corollary requirements include a course in ethics and a course in math, from the list below:

ETH 337 Business Ethics and Jewish Law
Studies Jewish law as it relates to the world of commerce and business and its application to modern situations. Focuses on classical halachic literature, including Talmud and related commentaries. Explores the ethical principles that govern conduct in the world of commerce. Emphasis is placed on common ethical questions and the practical application of Jewish moral principles to the business world. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (ETH 337A and ETH 337B).
Formerly RAB 337 (Jewish Law: Economics and Business Ethics)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

MAT 121 College Algebra (3 credits)
Covers and expands upon topics and skills that were introduced in high school algebra. Includes solving equations and inequalities, systems of equations and inequalities, linear relations and functions, and polynomial and radical equations.
Prerequisite(s): None

MAT 231 Calculus I (3 credits)
Introduces the study of calculus and reviews of the nature of functions. Includes limits and continuity involving algebraic and trigonometric functions. Covers differentiation of algebraic functions and trigonometric functions and applications of the derivative using techniques of differentiation. Further covers topics of integration, including integration of algebraic functions numerical integration and applications of the integral.
Prerequisite(s): MAT 121 (College Algebra) or equivalent (or high school pre-calculus)

STA 201 Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)
Develops an understanding of statistical methodology and use of critical judgment in analyzing data sets. Includes descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency, introduction to probability, both normal and binomial distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, linear regression, and correlation. Emphasizes developing the practical skills of interpreting and reporting descriptive and inferential univariate and bivariate statistical information.
Prerequisite(s): None

A minor in business is recommended for students interested in entering the fields of, or continuing their graduate studies in, accounting, business, economics, marketing or management. Knowledge gained will enhance the business side of any career one seeks.

Required courses:

ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I (3 credits)
Introduces basic accounting principles and preparation of financial statements. Focuses on understanding financial journals, ledgers, receivables, payables, inventory valuation, deferrals, accruals, plant assets, and debit/credit system. Explores internal controls, accounting ethics, and methods for evaluating financial information.
Prerequisite(s): None

ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II (3 credits)
Extends the application of basic accounting principles to partnership and corporate entities with an emphasis on the structure of corporate financial statements. Provides an overview of managerial accounting and the use of financial information in making decisions. Focuses on cost behavior, budgeting, performance evaluation, and the preparation and analysis of statements of cash flow and other advanced financial documents. Explores uses of technology and various software in the accounting process.
Prerequisite(s): ACC 101 (Principles of Accounting I)

ECO 112 Microeconomics (3 credits)
Overviews output and price theories of utility and demand, including production analysis and marginal product, and marginal costs, and pricing input factors, such as land, resources, wages, salaries, and the labor market. Also focuses on competition-perfect and imperfect oligopoly, monopoly regulation, and anti-trust policy, government policy and public choice, economic growth, international trade, and elements of risk and applied game theory.
Prerequisite(s): None

LAW 201 Business Law (3 credits)
Presents a broad introduction to the legal environment of business. Develops a basic understanding of contract law, torts, agency, and government regulation. Focuses on practical issues confronted in the business environment.
Prerequisite(s): None

MAR 301 Introduction to Marketing (3 credits)
Surveys the general concepts of marketing. Provides the basic knowledge to understand the “4 P’s” of marketing, consumer behavior, target markets, and web-based marketing. Introduces decision-making tools for integrating product, price, distribution, and communication decisions and processes into an organization competing in a global environment. Reinforces the applications of marketing terms to contemporary issues.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): None

MGT 301 Principles of Management and Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
Offers an introduction to management and organizational behaviors, explores the functions of management, group dynamics, and organizational structures, discusses how decisions are made effectively. Covers international organizational cultures and global perspectives of management.
Credit given for PSY 301 or MGT 301
Prerequisite(s): None

Corollary requirements include a course in ethics and a course in math, from the list below:

ETH 337 Business Ethics and Jewish Law
Studies Jewish law as it relates to the world of commerce and business and its application to modern situations. Focuses on classical halachic literature, including Talmud and related commentaries. Explores the ethical principles that govern conduct in the world of commerce. Emphasis is placed on common ethical questions and the practical application of Jewish moral principles to the business world. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (ETH 337A and ETH 337B).
Formerly RAB 337 (Jewish Law: Economics and Business Ethics)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

MAT 121 College Algebra (3 credits)
Covers and expands upon topics and skills that were introduced in high school algebra. Includes solving equations and inequalities, systems of equations and inequalities, linear relations and functions, and polynomial and radical equations.
Prerequisite(s): None

MAT 231 Calculus I (3 credits)
Introduces the study of calculus and reviews of the nature of functions. Includes limits and continuity involving algebraic and trigonometric functions. Covers differentiation of algebraic functions and trigonometric functions and applications of the derivative using techniques of differentiation. Further covers topics of integration, including integration of algebraic functions numerical integration and applications of the integral.
Prerequisite(s): MAT 121 (College Algebra) or equivalent (or high school pre-calculus)

STA 201 Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)
Develops an understanding of statistical methodology and use of critical judgment in analyzing data sets. Includes descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency, introduction to probability, both normal and binomial distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, linear regression, and correlation. Emphasizes developing the practical skills of interpreting and reporting descriptive and inferential univariate and bivariate statistical information.
Prerequisite(s): None

which can be useful in any field pursued.

Required core courses:

CIS 213 Computer Programming I (3 credits)
Introduces programming concepts using the Java SE programming language. Focuses on strategies for approaching programming problems and designing elegant, object-oriented software solutions.
Prerequisite(s): None

CIS 241 Data Structures (3 credits)
Explores the important data structures, both within programs and external to programs. Focuses on algorithms that utilize data structures.
Prerequisite(s): CIS 213 (Computer Programming)

CIS 315 Computer Programming II (3 credits)
Focuses on object-oriented programming concepts using the Java Standard Edition and Java Enterprise Edition programming language and demonstrates how to approach problems and design elegant, object-oriented software solutions. Introduces programming for the World Wide Web using HTML/CSS and Java Enterprise Edition technologies.
Prerequisite(s): CIS 213 (Computer Programming I)

Three elective courses from the following are required:

CIS 204 Programming in Python (3 credits)
Covers programming and problem solving using Python. Emphasizes principles of software development, creating algorithms, and testing. Focuses on procedures and functions, iteration, lists, dictionaries, strings, and function calls.
Prerequisite(s): None

CIS 311 Database Management Systems (3 credits)
Focuses on basic database concepts and definitions. Studies logical organization of a database, database architecture, data normalization, data modeling, database integrity, and the client/server environment. Emphasizes the use of Microsoft Access using ActiveX Data Projects and Data Access Objects, query processing, and transaction processing through Structured Query Language.
Prerequisite(s): None

CIS 330 Computer Systems Architecture (3 credits)
Focuses on the major architectural components of the computer and the role of the operating system. Focuses on the uses of assembly language programming, various components of the architecture function, and interaction of computer architecture and programming. Introduces logical circuit design and computer arithmetic.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): One programming language course

CIS 351 Programming Languages (3 credits)
Introduces concepts of programming language design and implementation through formal definition of a language’s specification of syntax and semantics. Compares the programming elements of various languages with specific emphasis on Perl, for the imperative language paradigm, and Java for the object-oriented language paradigm.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): CIS 315 (Computer Programming II)

CIS 355 Computer Systems, Networks and Information Technology (3 credits)
Provides a general overview of information technologies that enable the student to fully engage as a knowledge worker that uses and interacts with computer systems, networks, and information technologies that are used in today's business environment. Topics include digital information systems, hardware and software, operating systems, the Internet, data communications, systems development life cycle, and information security. Aims to help students achieve a level of technological fluency essential for information professionals across a variety of specific career interests.
Prerequisite(s): None

CIS 365 Web Programming (3 credits)
Introduces the current standard of HTML. Explores the basics of Cascading Style Sheets for the design and layout of webpages, as well as the basics of client side scripting through Javascript and server side scripting through Hypertext Preprocessor. Examines databases for websites and the use of Structured Query Language to connect to the databases.
Prerequisite(s): CIS 315 (Computer Programming II) or faculty permission

which can be useful in any field pursued.

Required core courses:

CIS 213 Computer Programming I (3 credits)
Introduces programming concepts using the Java SE programming language. Focuses on strategies for approaching programming problems and designing elegant, object-oriented software solutions.
Prerequisite(s): None

CIS 241 Data Structures (3 credits)
Explores the important data structures, both within programs and external to programs. Focuses on algorithms that utilize data structures.
Prerequisite(s): CIS 213 (Computer Programming)

CIS 315 Computer Programming II (3 credits)
Focuses on object-oriented programming concepts using the Java Standard Edition and Java Enterprise Edition programming language and demonstrates how to approach problems and design elegant, object-oriented software solutions. Introduces programming for the World Wide Web using HTML/CSS and Java Enterprise Edition technologies.
Prerequisite(s): CIS 213 (Computer Programming I)

Three elective courses from the following are required:

CIS 204 Programming in Python (3 credits)
Covers programming and problem solving using Python. Emphasizes principles of software development, creating algorithms, and testing. Focuses on procedures and functions, iteration, lists, dictionaries, strings, and function calls.
Prerequisite(s): None

CIS 311 Database Management Systems (3 credits)
Focuses on basic database concepts and definitions. Studies logical organization of a database, database architecture, data normalization, data modeling, database integrity, and the client/server environment. Emphasizes the use of Microsoft Access using ActiveX Data Projects and Data Access Objects, query processing, and transaction processing through Structured Query Language.
Prerequisite(s): None

CIS 330 Computer Systems Architecture (3 credits)
Focuses on the major architectural components of the computer and the role of the operating system. Focuses on the uses of assembly language programming, various components of the architecture function, and interaction of computer architecture and programming. Introduces logical circuit design and computer arithmetic.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): One programming language course

CIS 351 Programming Languages (3 credits)
Introduces concepts of programming language design and implementation through formal definition of a language’s specification of syntax and semantics. Compares the programming elements of various languages with specific emphasis on Perl, for the imperative language paradigm, and Java for the object-oriented language paradigm.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): CIS 315 (Computer Programming II)

CIS 355 Computer Systems, Networks and Information Technology (3 credits)
Provides a general overview of information technologies that enable the student to fully engage as a knowledge worker that uses and interacts with computer systems, networks, and information technologies that are used in today's business environment. Topics include digital information systems, hardware and software, operating systems, the Internet, data communications, systems development life cycle, and information security. Aims to help students achieve a level of technological fluency essential for information professionals across a variety of specific career interests.
Prerequisite(s): None

CIS 365 Web Programming (3 credits)
Introduces the current standard of HTML. Explores the basics of Cascading Style Sheets for the design and layout of webpages, as well as the basics of client side scripting through Javascript and server side scripting through Hypertext Preprocessor. Examines databases for websites and the use of Structured Query Language to connect to the databases.
Prerequisite(s): CIS 315 (Computer Programming II) or faculty permission

A minor in Communication Sciences and Disorders prepares students interested in pursuing careers in audiology and speech-language pathology. Students gain exposure to various aspects of speech, hearing and language processes and disorders. Courses in this track are prerequisites for admission to graduate programs in these fields.

Required core course:

CSD 222 Introduction to Communication Disorders (3 credits)
Introduces human communication disorders with a focus on the neuroanatomic, acoustic, biological, psychological, developmental, and linguistic principles underlying human communication disorders. Provides an overview of the field of speech-language pathology and audiology with an emphasis on the scientific aspects of clinical assessment and rehabilitation of clients.
Prerequisite(s): None
Three elective courses from the following are required:

CSD 255 Clinical Observation in Pediatric SLP Therapies (1-3 credits)
Offers an opportunity for students to explore the field of speech language pathology by observing speech language therapists working with children. Allows students to integrate theory and practice and engage in a team-based work environment. Involves student assisting the therapist with maintaining the therapy room and preparing materials for therapy while gaining exposure to intended field of interest. Course allows for variable credit hours dependent upon clinical assignment and observation schedule. Requires a special application.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders)

CSD 301 Speech and Hearing Science (3 credits)
Discusses acoustics, psychoacoustics and instrumentation used in hearing and speech science and elements of speech production and perception. Covers anatomy and physiology relevant to understanding the speech and hearing mechanisms.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders)

CSD 303 Audiology (3 credits)
Explores clinical audiology, along with the pathologies, etiologies, evaluation and remediation of hearing impairment and loss. Discusses assessment and diagnosis of disorders as well as current assistive and rehabilitative technology.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders) and CSD 301 (Speech and Hearing Science)

CSD 315 Normal Speech and Language Development (3 credits)
Examines theories of language development. Discusses language milestones, cognitive and sociological bases for development of language, and bilingualism. Covers language development from birth through adulthood and school-age literacy development.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders)

CSD 320 Language Disorders (3 credits)
Explores language disorders and how to understand them based on their characteristics. Examines assessment strategies and procedures used with language disordered populations. Covers intervention techniques used with a variety of language-disordered populations.
Prerequisite(s): CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders) and CSD 315 (Normal Speech and Language Development)

CSD 333 Anatomical and Physiological Bases of Speech (3 credits)
Introduces the anatomical and physiological bases of communication. Focuses on the respiratory,
Introduces the anatomical and physiological bases of communication. Focuses on the respiratory, phonatory, articulatory, resonatory, and nervous systems, and the contributions of each system to spoken communication. Discusses anatomical structures involved in linguistic communication within the context of all the body systems involved in speech production.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders)

CSD 399 Aural Rehabilitation (3 credits)
Studies the options available for managing adults and children who are hard of hearing, with emphasis on psychosocial issues, counseling, amplification options and technology, interventions, and communication strategies.
Prerequisite: CSD 303 (Audiology)

CSD 400 Phonetics (3 credits)
Examines how to perceive, describe, categorize, and transcribe the speech sounds in American English. Prepares students to transcribe consonants and vowels, connected speech, and individuals with speech sound disorders. Discusses speech disorders versus speech differences and how they are treated clinically.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders)


CSD 402 Disorders of Articulation and Phonology (3 credits)
Covers disorders of speech sound production. Discusses biological, cognitive, linguistic, and ethnocultural systems influencing speech production, as well as contributing/causal factors, theories of acquisition, assessment and treatment issues.
Prerequisite(s): CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders) and CSD 400 (Phonetics)

CSD 406 Independent Study in Communication Sciences and Disorders (3 credits)
Provides an opportunity to develop advanced knowledge in the field of communication sciences and disorders and examine an area of interest related to communication sciences and disorders and/or professional and client services in the field of communication sciences and disorders. May involve the completion of independent research or an in-depth project related to the field of communication sciences and disorders. Enrollment requires development of a written independent study proposal and pre-approval of the Academic Dean. Limited to a maximum of 6 credits over the course of the degree.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing in the communication sciences and disorders minor; Minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in the minor

CSD 430 Neurological Basis of Communication (3 credits)
Covers basic neurological aspects of the anatomy and physiology of speech and hearing development. Explores neuroanatomy, cellular physiology and critical organization of the nervous system responsible for the development and use of verbal and non-verbal language in humans.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders)

CSD 490 Clinical Methods in Speech Language Pathology/Audiology (3 credits)
Covers various clinical methods, evaluations and practices. Provides an in-depth understanding of treatment, maintenance, and selection of target behaviors. Discusses multicultural issues, knowledge of professional issues and ASHA code of ethics.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders) and two CSD courses

Corollary requirement:

STA 201 Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)
Develops an understanding of statistical methodology and use of critical judgment in analyzing data sets. Includes descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency, introduction to probability, both normal and binomial distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, linear regression, and correlation. Emphasizes developing the practical skills of interpreting and reporting descriptive and inferential univariate and bivariate statistical information.
Prerequisite(s): None

A minor in Communication Sciences and Disorders prepares students interested in pursuing careers in audiology and speech-language pathology. Students gain exposure to various aspects of speech, hearing and language processes and disorders. Courses in this track are prerequisites for admission to graduate programs in these fields.

Required core course:

CSD 222 Introduction to Communication Disorders (3 credits)
Introduces human communication disorders with a focus on the neuroanatomic, acoustic, biological, psychological, developmental, and linguistic principles underlying human communication disorders. Provides an overview of the field of speech-language pathology and audiology with an emphasis on the scientific aspects of clinical assessment and rehabilitation of clients.
Prerequisite(s): None
Three elective courses from the following are required:

CSD 255 Clinical Observation in Pediatric SLP Therapies (1-3 credits)
Offers an opportunity for students to explore the field of speech language pathology by observing speech language therapists working with children. Allows students to integrate theory and practice and engage in a team-based work environment. Involves student assisting the therapist with maintaining the therapy room and preparing materials for therapy while gaining exposure to intended field of interest. Course allows for variable credit hours dependent upon clinical assignment and observation schedule. Requires a special application.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders)

CSD 301 Speech and Hearing Science (3 credits)
Discusses acoustics, psychoacoustics and instrumentation used in hearing and speech science and elements of speech production and perception. Covers anatomy and physiology relevant to understanding the speech and hearing mechanisms.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders)

CSD 303 Audiology (3 credits)
Explores clinical audiology, along with the pathologies, etiologies, evaluation and remediation of hearing impairment and loss. Discusses assessment and diagnosis of disorders as well as current assistive and rehabilitative technology.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders) and CSD 301 (Speech and Hearing Science)

CSD 315 Normal Speech and Language Development (3 credits)
Examines theories of language development. Discusses language milestones, cognitive and sociological bases for development of language, and bilingualism. Covers language development from birth through adulthood and school-age literacy development.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders)

CSD 320 Language Disorders (3 credits)
Explores language disorders and how to understand them based on their characteristics. Examines assessment strategies and procedures used with language disordered populations. Covers intervention techniques used with a variety of language-disordered populations.
Prerequisite(s): CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders) and CSD 315 (Normal Speech and Language Development)

CSD 333 Anatomical and Physiological Bases of Speech (3 credits)
Introduces the anatomical and physiological bases of communication. Focuses on the respiratory,
Introduces the anatomical and physiological bases of communication. Focuses on the respiratory, phonatory, articulatory, resonatory, and nervous systems, and the contributions of each system to spoken communication. Discusses anatomical structures involved in linguistic communication within the context of all the body systems involved in speech production.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders)

CSD 399 Aural Rehabilitation (3 credits)
Studies the options available for managing adults and children who are hard of hearing, with emphasis on psychosocial issues, counseling, amplification options and technology, interventions, and communication strategies.
Prerequisite: CSD 303 (Audiology)

CSD 400 Phonetics (3 credits)
Examines how to perceive, describe, categorize, and transcribe the speech sounds in American English. Prepares students to transcribe consonants and vowels, connected speech, and individuals with speech sound disorders. Discusses speech disorders versus speech differences and how they are treated clinically.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders)


CSD 402 Disorders of Articulation and Phonology (3 credits)
Covers disorders of speech sound production. Discusses biological, cognitive, linguistic, and ethnocultural systems influencing speech production, as well as contributing/causal factors, theories of acquisition, assessment and treatment issues.
Prerequisite(s): CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders) and CSD 400 (Phonetics)

CSD 406 Independent Study in Communication Sciences and Disorders (3 credits)
Provides an opportunity to develop advanced knowledge in the field of communication sciences and disorders and examine an area of interest related to communication sciences and disorders and/or professional and client services in the field of communication sciences and disorders. May involve the completion of independent research or an in-depth project related to the field of communication sciences and disorders. Enrollment requires development of a written independent study proposal and pre-approval of the Academic Dean. Limited to a maximum of 6 credits over the course of the degree.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing in the communication sciences and disorders minor; Minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in the minor

CSD 430 Neurological Basis of Communication (3 credits)
Covers basic neurological aspects of the anatomy and physiology of speech and hearing development. Explores neuroanatomy, cellular physiology and critical organization of the nervous system responsible for the development and use of verbal and non-verbal language in humans.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders)

CSD 490 Clinical Methods in Speech Language Pathology/Audiology (3 credits)
Covers various clinical methods, evaluations and practices. Provides an in-depth understanding of treatment, maintenance, and selection of target behaviors. Discusses multicultural issues, knowledge of professional issues and ASHA code of ethics.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): CSD 222 (Introduction to Communication Disorders) and two CSD courses

Corollary requirement:

STA 201 Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)
Develops an understanding of statistical methodology and use of critical judgment in analyzing data sets. Includes descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency, introduction to probability, both normal and binomial distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, linear regression, and correlation. Emphasizes developing the practical skills of interpreting and reporting descriptive and inferential univariate and bivariate statistical information.
Prerequisite(s): None

A minor in psychology enriches all fields which involve interpersonal connections, including business, education, allied health, and social work. Students are exposed to foundational coursework in psychology, including theories and research methods.

Required core courses:

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
Provides a comprehensive introduction to the science of psychology. Addresses historical perspectives, research methods, biological bases to behavior, sensation and perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, language, lifespan development, intelligence, stress and health, personality, and social behavior. Also examines abnormal behavior and treatment options. Discusses applications of psychology in a culturally diverse world.
Prerequisite(s): None

PSY 322 Research Methods in Psychology (3 credits)
Introduces experimental design and inference in the field of psychological research. Teaches the experimental method and its application to recent problems in psychological research. Discusses research-related ethics and the feasibility of different research designs.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): STA 201 (Introduction to Statistics)

Four additional elective courses from the following:

PSY 225 Psychological Perspectives on Psalms (3 credits)
Discusses the various songs of Tehillim and explores the psychological, theological and historical elements that are found in each individual (psalm) song. Explores how to connect to the diversity of raw emotions portrayed in the text and discover the therapeutic function and tools in the psalm. Discusses the psychological and theological elements of each song and how to integrate them into one’s personal and professional life. Delves into the mystical Hebrew Alphabet to see the significance of King David’s alphabetizing the verses of his longest psalm, #119.
Credit given for PSY 115 or BIB 325
Prerequisite(s): None

PSY 230 Psychological Foundations of Education (3 credits)
Studies the psychological foundations of learning, memory and creativity, as related to educational processes. Emphasizes characterization of educational approaches in the context of important physical, cognitive and motivational variables. Surveys relevant scientific research and relates research findings to practical applications in and outside the classroom. Addresses complex topics such as standardized tests, bilingual populations, and the influences of home and community attitudes towards learning and education.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 280 Human Growth and Development (3 credits)
Provides students with a broad knowledge and understanding of the field of developmental psychology. Emphasizes major theories, perspectives and associated research as they relate to the physical, cognitive and psychosocial aspects of development from conception through the end of life. Examines typical growth and development patterns as well as factors that lead to disruption and change in those patterns. Students will develop insight into the factors that make people the way they are and how to support healthy human growth and development.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 290 Multicultural Psychology (3 credits)
Explores international and domestic diversity from a psychological perspective. Applies psychological theories and methods to develop an understanding of how diversity in many aspects of life, including gender, age, mental and physical ability, race, ethnicity, relationships, socioeconomic status, family structure, and religion impact human perspectives and interactions. Explores the psychological impact of racism, discrimination, stereotypes, prejudice, privilege, and oppression on society, politics, and education. Considers the role of social movements and consciousness-raising in psychologically empowering individuals and minority groups.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): PSY 101(Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 299 Psychology in a Culturally Diverse Society (3 credits)
Provides insight into and analysis of the theories and dynamics of diverse cultures. Applies psychological principles, theories, and research to a broad range of interpersonal relationships, includes cross-cultural research and different cultural perspectives.
Prerequisite(s): None

PSY 301 Principles of Management and Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
Offers an introduction to management and organizational behaviors, explores the functions of management, group dynamics, and organizational structures, discusses how decisions are made effectively. Covers international organizational cultures and global perspectives of management.
Credit given for PSY 301 or MGT 301
Prerequisite(s): None

PSY 331 Introduction to Counseling (3 credits)
Defines the role and goals of counseling. Examines the nature of the helping relationship; counseling skills and techniques; ethics in counseling; components of effective helping in a theoretical, as well as practical framework; and counseling resources.
Prerequisite(s): None

PSY 352 Theories of Personality (3 credits)
Explores major personality theories and related research. Covers basic personality traits and their measurements and developmental influences.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 360 Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)
Presents an in-depth review of the historical and philosophical foundations of abnormal psychology and psychopathology, as well as the development of classification systems for mental disorders and its implication for diagnosis and treatment. Discusses the integrated roles of biology, psychology and social context, issues related to assessment, legal considerations and the role of ethics and morality.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 370 Social Psychology (3 credits)
Provides an introduction to social psychology, including research, theory, and general principles of how people interact with and influence each other both individually and in groups. Covers the processing of social information, social influence, persuasion and attitude change, social interaction, prejudice, conformity, social psychology in court, and group phenomena. Highlights landmark studies in social psychology and applies social psychology principles to current social problems and topics.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology) or SOC 101 (Introduction to Sociology)

PSY 378 Psychobiology (3 credits)
Focuses on the relationship between biological and psychological phenomena (i.e., the mind-body connection). Explores the genetic foundations, developmental processes, and neurobiological systems that underlie and influence behavior, cognition, emotion, motivation, learning, memory, vision, sensation, and movement. Develops an appreciation for the reciprocal relationship between psychological experiences and environment and neurological development and brain functioning. Also studies the various illnesses and disabilities that occur when biological and psychological processes go awry and how knowledge of psychobiology can contribute to diagnosis and important treatment decisions.
Credit given for PSY 378 or BIO 301
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 381 Differentiated Instruction (3 credits)
Introduces the principles of differentiated instruction, including reading across the curriculum, implementation of individualized education plans (IEPs) in the general education classroom, and teaching through different modalities. Focuses on effective co-teaching, universal design for learning, formative and summative assessment, and response to intervention/multi-tiered systems of support.
Credit given for PSY 381 or EDU 415
Prerequisite(s): PSY 383 (Survey of Exceptional Children)

PSY 383 Survey of Exceptional Children (3 credits)
Introduces the concepts and principles of special education, and the academic, behavioral, and physical disabilities practitioners may encounter in the field. Discusses the construction and implementation of Individual Education Programs (IEPs). Covers basic diagnostic procedures, interventions, and strategies for the inclusive classroom.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 397 Group Dynamics (3 credits)
Provides an understanding of group processes, group formation, and the development of social skills in small groups. Covers group development, power structures in groups, leadership, group processes, communication in groups, decision making, conflict, and bias. Investigates the application of theory to contemporary issues in group dynamics.
Credit given for SOC 397 or PSY 397
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology) or SOC 101 (Introduction to Sociology)

PSY 406 Independent Study in Psychology (3 credits)
Provides an opportunity to develop advanced knowledge in the field of psychology and examine an area of interest related to psychology and/or psychology services. May involve the completion of independent research or an in-depth project related to the field of psychology. Enrollment requires development of a written independent study proposal and pre-approval of the Academic Dean. Limited to a maximum of 6 credits over the course of the degree.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing in the psychology major or minor; Minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in the major or minor

PSY 490 Senior Thesis in Psychology (3 credits)
Serves as the culmination of the psychology major. Requires the development of a project based on existing research and data sets that models the application of appropriate research methodology. Examines the process of publishing research in the field of psychology. Note: Credit may not be earned for both PSY 490 and PSY 491.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 (English Composition I), PSY 322 (Research Methods in Psychology), and STA 201 (Introduction to Statistics); Senior standing in psychology major

PSY 491 Advanced Senior Thesis in Psychology (6 credits)
Serves as the culmination of the psychology major. Requires the development of a project based on original research that models the application of appropriate research methodology. Examines the process of publishing research in the field of psychology. Approval of the project by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) is required. Note: Credit may not be earned for both PSY 491 and PSY 490.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 (English Composition I), PSY 322 (Research Methods in Psychology), and STA 201 (Introduction to Statistics); Senior standing in psychology major

PSY 499 Internship in Psychology (1-3 credits)
Provides opportunity for exploration of the field of psychology in a professional setting. Allows students to integrate theory and practice and engage in a team-based work environment. Requires completion of 45-135 clock hours under the supervision of a licensed practitioner in the field. Requires a special application.
Prerequisite(s): Psychology major or minor with junior standing or higher

Corollary requirements include Introduction to Statistics and a course in ethics, from the list below:

STA 201 Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)
Develops an understanding of statistical methodology and use of critical judgment in analyzing data sets. Includes descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency, introduction to probability, both normal and binomial distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, linear regression, and correlation. Emphasizes developing the practical skills of interpreting and reporting descriptive and inferential univariate and bivariate statistical information.
Prerequisite(s): None

ETH 325 Tomer Devora: Pathways to Ethical Living (3 credits)
Explores the development of compassion as exemplified by G-d’s compassionate acts towards the Jewish People. Delves into the Tomer Devora by Rabbi Moshe Cordovero, which examines G-d’s thirteen attributes of rachamim. Explores ways of emulating G-d’s attributes to improve one’s character, live ethically, and enhance interpersonal relationships. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (ETH 325A and ETH 325B).
Prerequisite(s): None

ETH 337 Business Ethics and Jewish Law (3 credits)
Studies Jewish law as it relates to the world of commerce and business and its application to modern situations. Focuses on classical halachic literature, including Talmud and related commentaries. Explores the ethical principles that govern conduct in the world of commerce. Emphasis is placed on common ethical questions and the practical application of Jewish moral principles to the business world. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (ETH 337A and ETH 337B).
Formerly RAB 337 (Jewish Law: Economics and Business Ethics)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

ETH 390 Ethical Interpersonal Communication (3 credits)
Studies the Jewish laws of interpersonal communication. Emphasizes the laws of speech drawing from the Chofetz Chaim, Gemara, Medrashim, Rambam, Rabeinu Yona, and other Rishonim and Acharonim.
Formerly JST 390 (Ethical Interpersonal Communication)
Prerequisite(s): None

ETH 466 Medical Ethics and Jewish Law (3 credits)
Discusses the structure and development of Jewish ethics and halacha (law) connected to the fields of health and medicine. Explores the development of medical ethics and the evolution of halacha related to medicine. Covers the Jewish approach to health and healing and major ethical issues and debates that arise in the field of medicine. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (ETH 466A and ETH 466B).
Formerly JST 466 (Judaism in Medicine: History, Ethics and Halacha)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

A minor in psychology enriches all fields which involve interpersonal connections, including business, education, allied health, and social work. Students are exposed to foundational coursework in psychology, including theories and research methods.

Required core courses:

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology (3 credits)
Provides a comprehensive introduction to the science of psychology. Addresses historical perspectives, research methods, biological bases to behavior, sensation and perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, language, lifespan development, intelligence, stress and health, personality, and social behavior. Also examines abnormal behavior and treatment options. Discusses applications of psychology in a culturally diverse world.
Prerequisite(s): None

PSY 322 Research Methods in Psychology (3 credits)
Introduces experimental design and inference in the field of psychological research. Teaches the experimental method and its application to recent problems in psychological research. Discusses research-related ethics and the feasibility of different research designs.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): STA 201 (Introduction to Statistics)

Four additional elective courses from the following:

PSY 225 Psychological Perspectives on Psalms (3 credits)
Discusses the various songs of Tehillim and explores the psychological, theological and historical elements that are found in each individual (psalm) song. Explores how to connect to the diversity of raw emotions portrayed in the text and discover the therapeutic function and tools in the psalm. Discusses the psychological and theological elements of each song and how to integrate them into one’s personal and professional life. Delves into the mystical Hebrew Alphabet to see the significance of King David’s alphabetizing the verses of his longest psalm, #119.
Credit given for PSY 115 or BIB 325
Prerequisite(s): None

PSY 230 Psychological Foundations of Education (3 credits)
Studies the psychological foundations of learning, memory and creativity, as related to educational processes. Emphasizes characterization of educational approaches in the context of important physical, cognitive and motivational variables. Surveys relevant scientific research and relates research findings to practical applications in and outside the classroom. Addresses complex topics such as standardized tests, bilingual populations, and the influences of home and community attitudes towards learning and education.
Prerequisite or Corequisite: PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 280 Human Growth and Development (3 credits)
Provides students with a broad knowledge and understanding of the field of developmental psychology. Emphasizes major theories, perspectives and associated research as they relate to the physical, cognitive and psychosocial aspects of development from conception through the end of life. Examines typical growth and development patterns as well as factors that lead to disruption and change in those patterns. Students will develop insight into the factors that make people the way they are and how to support healthy human growth and development.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 290 Multicultural Psychology (3 credits)
Explores international and domestic diversity from a psychological perspective. Applies psychological theories and methods to develop an understanding of how diversity in many aspects of life, including gender, age, mental and physical ability, race, ethnicity, relationships, socioeconomic status, family structure, and religion impact human perspectives and interactions. Explores the psychological impact of racism, discrimination, stereotypes, prejudice, privilege, and oppression on society, politics, and education. Considers the role of social movements and consciousness-raising in psychologically empowering individuals and minority groups.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): PSY 101(Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 299 Psychology in a Culturally Diverse Society (3 credits)
Provides insight into and analysis of the theories and dynamics of diverse cultures. Applies psychological principles, theories, and research to a broad range of interpersonal relationships, includes cross-cultural research and different cultural perspectives.
Prerequisite(s): None

PSY 301 Principles of Management and Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
Offers an introduction to management and organizational behaviors, explores the functions of management, group dynamics, and organizational structures, discusses how decisions are made effectively. Covers international organizational cultures and global perspectives of management.
Credit given for PSY 301 or MGT 301
Prerequisite(s): None

PSY 331 Introduction to Counseling (3 credits)
Defines the role and goals of counseling. Examines the nature of the helping relationship; counseling skills and techniques; ethics in counseling; components of effective helping in a theoretical, as well as practical framework; and counseling resources.
Prerequisite(s): None

PSY 352 Theories of Personality (3 credits)
Explores major personality theories and related research. Covers basic personality traits and their measurements and developmental influences.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 360 Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)
Presents an in-depth review of the historical and philosophical foundations of abnormal psychology and psychopathology, as well as the development of classification systems for mental disorders and its implication for diagnosis and treatment. Discusses the integrated roles of biology, psychology and social context, issues related to assessment, legal considerations and the role of ethics and morality.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 370 Social Psychology (3 credits)
Provides an introduction to social psychology, including research, theory, and general principles of how people interact with and influence each other both individually and in groups. Covers the processing of social information, social influence, persuasion and attitude change, social interaction, prejudice, conformity, social psychology in court, and group phenomena. Highlights landmark studies in social psychology and applies social psychology principles to current social problems and topics.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology) or SOC 101 (Introduction to Sociology)

PSY 378 Psychobiology (3 credits)
Focuses on the relationship between biological and psychological phenomena (i.e., the mind-body connection). Explores the genetic foundations, developmental processes, and neurobiological systems that underlie and influence behavior, cognition, emotion, motivation, learning, memory, vision, sensation, and movement. Develops an appreciation for the reciprocal relationship between psychological experiences and environment and neurological development and brain functioning. Also studies the various illnesses and disabilities that occur when biological and psychological processes go awry and how knowledge of psychobiology can contribute to diagnosis and important treatment decisions.
Credit given for PSY 378 or BIO 301
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 381 Differentiated Instruction (3 credits)
Introduces the principles of differentiated instruction, including reading across the curriculum, implementation of individualized education plans (IEPs) in the general education classroom, and teaching through different modalities. Focuses on effective co-teaching, universal design for learning, formative and summative assessment, and response to intervention/multi-tiered systems of support.
Credit given for PSY 381 or EDU 415
Prerequisite(s): PSY 383 (Survey of Exceptional Children)

PSY 383 Survey of Exceptional Children (3 credits)
Introduces the concepts and principles of special education, and the academic, behavioral, and physical disabilities practitioners may encounter in the field. Discusses the construction and implementation of Individual Education Programs (IEPs). Covers basic diagnostic procedures, interventions, and strategies for the inclusive classroom.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 397 Group Dynamics (3 credits)
Provides an understanding of group processes, group formation, and the development of social skills in small groups. Covers group development, power structures in groups, leadership, group processes, communication in groups, decision making, conflict, and bias. Investigates the application of theory to contemporary issues in group dynamics.
Credit given for SOC 397 or PSY 397
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology) or SOC 101 (Introduction to Sociology)

PSY 406 Independent Study in Psychology (3 credits)
Provides an opportunity to develop advanced knowledge in the field of psychology and examine an area of interest related to psychology and/or psychology services. May involve the completion of independent research or an in-depth project related to the field of psychology. Enrollment requires development of a written independent study proposal and pre-approval of the Academic Dean. Limited to a maximum of 6 credits over the course of the degree.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing in the psychology major or minor; Minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in the major or minor

PSY 490 Senior Thesis in Psychology (3 credits)
Serves as the culmination of the psychology major. Requires the development of a project based on existing research and data sets that models the application of appropriate research methodology. Examines the process of publishing research in the field of psychology. Note: Credit may not be earned for both PSY 490 and PSY 491.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 (English Composition I), PSY 322 (Research Methods in Psychology), and STA 201 (Introduction to Statistics); Senior standing in psychology major

PSY 491 Advanced Senior Thesis in Psychology (6 credits)
Serves as the culmination of the psychology major. Requires the development of a project based on original research that models the application of appropriate research methodology. Examines the process of publishing research in the field of psychology. Approval of the project by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) is required. Note: Credit may not be earned for both PSY 491 and PSY 490.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 (English Composition I), PSY 322 (Research Methods in Psychology), and STA 201 (Introduction to Statistics); Senior standing in psychology major

PSY 499 Internship in Psychology (1-3 credits)
Provides opportunity for exploration of the field of psychology in a professional setting. Allows students to integrate theory and practice and engage in a team-based work environment. Requires completion of 45-135 clock hours under the supervision of a licensed practitioner in the field. Requires a special application.
Prerequisite(s): Psychology major or minor with junior standing or higher

Corollary requirements include Introduction to Statistics and a course in ethics, from the list below:

STA 201 Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)
Develops an understanding of statistical methodology and use of critical judgment in analyzing data sets. Includes descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency, introduction to probability, both normal and binomial distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, linear regression, and correlation. Emphasizes developing the practical skills of interpreting and reporting descriptive and inferential univariate and bivariate statistical information.
Prerequisite(s): None

ETH 325 Tomer Devora: Pathways to Ethical Living (3 credits)
Explores the development of compassion as exemplified by G-d’s compassionate acts towards the Jewish People. Delves into the Tomer Devora by Rabbi Moshe Cordovero, which examines G-d’s thirteen attributes of rachamim. Explores ways of emulating G-d’s attributes to improve one’s character, live ethically, and enhance interpersonal relationships. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (ETH 325A and ETH 325B).
Prerequisite(s): None

ETH 337 Business Ethics and Jewish Law (3 credits)
Studies Jewish law as it relates to the world of commerce and business and its application to modern situations. Focuses on classical halachic literature, including Talmud and related commentaries. Explores the ethical principles that govern conduct in the world of commerce. Emphasis is placed on common ethical questions and the practical application of Jewish moral principles to the business world. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (ETH 337A and ETH 337B).
Formerly RAB 337 (Jewish Law: Economics and Business Ethics)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

ETH 390 Ethical Interpersonal Communication (3 credits)
Studies the Jewish laws of interpersonal communication. Emphasizes the laws of speech drawing from the Chofetz Chaim, Gemara, Medrashim, Rambam, Rabeinu Yona, and other Rishonim and Acharonim.
Formerly JST 390 (Ethical Interpersonal Communication)
Prerequisite(s): None

ETH 466 Medical Ethics and Jewish Law (3 credits)
Discusses the structure and development of Jewish ethics and halacha (law) connected to the fields of health and medicine. Explores the development of medical ethics and the evolution of halacha related to medicine. Covers the Jewish approach to health and healing and major ethical issues and debates that arise in the field of medicine. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (ETH 466A and ETH 466B).
Formerly JST 466 (Judaism in Medicine: History, Ethics and Halacha)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

A minor in Pre-Health Sciences offers coursework necessary for admission to graduate and professional studies in allied health fields such as dental hygiene, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assistant, and ultrasound. Courses in the Pre-Health Minor offer students a strong background to continue studies in biology or other sciences.

Required core courses:

BIO 110 Biology I: Molecular and Cells (4 credits)
Studies the major biological principles that encompass all living things. Introduces cell structure and function, physical and chemical properties of the cell, reproduction of the cell and organism, genetics, biochemistry, properties of energy and energy in chemical reactions, photosynthesis, and cellular respiration. The laboratory portion covers biology principles, as well as lab techniques and the process of scientific experimentation, experimental design, and analysis. Note: Credit may not be earned for both BIO 110 and BIO 109.
Prerequisite(s): None

BIO 220 Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
Studies the gross anatomy of the human body, including the cellular and physiological structures and major systems. Emphasizes the basic interrelationships of normal human anatomy and physiology systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis. Includes lecture and laboratory components.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 110 (Biology I: Molecular and Cells)

BIO 221 Anatomy and Physiology II (4 credits)
Provides further study on the human body structure and its functions. Covers advanced principles of the cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, excretory (urinary), endocrine, and reproductive (male and female) systems. Develops advanced understanding of the interrelationships among systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis. Includes lecture and laboratory components.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 220 (Anatomy and Physiology I)

One additional science course from the following:

BIO 230 Microbiology (4 credits)
Introduces the study of Microbiology. Examines microbes such as bacteria, viruses, protozoa and fungi and their impact on humans and on the environment. The laboratory portion covers lab techniques including proper use of microscopes, staining, aseptic technique, and the process of scientific experimentation, recording data, and analysis.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 110 (Biology I: Molecular and Cells)

CHE 107 Fundamentals of Chemistry (3 credits)
Introduces the fundamental concepts of chemistry. Covers topics including include atomic structure, periodic table, bonding, various states of matter, nomenclature, chemical reactions, chemical equations, and quantitative relationships.
Prerequisite(s): None

PHY 101 Fundamentals of Physics (4 credits)
Covers the basic principles of physics. Introduces the concepts of Newtonian mechanics, kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, sound and heat applications. Geared to students entering science, health and technology fields. Includes a lab component that provides a hands-on approach to physical phenomena. Experiments focus on core physics concepts of mechanics: force, motion, conservation laws, and oscillations.
Prerequisite(s): MAT 121 (College Algebra) or equivalent

One elective course from the following:

BIO 115 Medical Terminology (3 credits)
Introduces the language and terminology of the medical field. Explores how medical terms are constructed and used within the field. Discusses how to define, interpret, and translate medical terms as they appear in medical documentation and records.
Prerequisite(s): None

BIO 265 Nutrition (3 credits)
Provides an overview to the study of nutrition and food science. Discusses nutrients, other food substances, food sources, food interactions, and balanced diets as they relate to healthy living and well-being. Covers the importance of nutrition and its connection to healthy body function.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 220 (Anatomy and Physiology I)

BIO 301 Psychobiology (3 credits)
Focuses on the relationship between biological and psychological phenomena (i.e., the mind-body connection). Explores the genetic foundations, developmental processes, and neurobiological systems that underlie and influence behavior, cognition, emotion, motivation, learning, memory, vision, sensation, and movement. Develops an appreciation for the reciprocal relationship between psychological experiences and environment and neurological development and brain functioning. Also studies the various illnesses and disabilities that occur when biological and psychological processes go awry and how knowledge of psychobiology can contribute to diagnosis and important treatment decisions.
Credit given for BIO 301 or PSY 378
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 280 Human Growth and Development (3 credits)
Provides students with a broad knowledge and understanding of the field of developmental psychology. Emphasizes major theories, perspectives and associated research as they relate to the physical, cognitive and psychosocial aspects of development from conception through the end of life. Examines typical growth and development patterns as well as factors that lead to disruption and change in those patterns. Students will develop insight into the factors that make people the way they are and how to support healthy human growth and development.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 360 Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)
Presents an in-depth review of the historical and philosophical foundations of abnormal psychology and psychopathology, as well as the development of classification systems for mental disorders and its implication for diagnosis and treatment. Discusses the integrated roles of biology, psychology and social context, issues related to assessment, legal considerations and the role of ethics and morality.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

STA 201 Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)
Develops an understanding of statistical methodology and use of critical judgment in analyzing data sets. Includes descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency, introduction to probability, both normal and binomial distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, linear regression, and correlation. Emphasizes developing the practical skills of interpreting and reporting descriptive and inferential univariate and bivariate statistical information.
Prerequisite(s): None

A minor in Pre-Health Sciences offers coursework necessary for admission to graduate and professional studies in allied health fields such as dental hygiene, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assistant, and ultrasound. Courses in the Pre-Health Minor offer students a strong background to continue studies in biology or other sciences.

Required core courses:

BIO 110 Biology I: Molecular and Cells (4 credits)
Studies the major biological principles that encompass all living things. Introduces cell structure and function, physical and chemical properties of the cell, reproduction of the cell and organism, genetics, biochemistry, properties of energy and energy in chemical reactions, photosynthesis, and cellular respiration. The laboratory portion covers biology principles, as well as lab techniques and the process of scientific experimentation, experimental design, and analysis. Note: Credit may not be earned for both BIO 110 and BIO 109.
Prerequisite(s): None

BIO 220 Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
Studies the gross anatomy of the human body, including the cellular and physiological structures and major systems. Emphasizes the basic interrelationships of normal human anatomy and physiology systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis. Includes lecture and laboratory components.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 110 (Biology I: Molecular and Cells)

BIO 221 Anatomy and Physiology II (4 credits)
Provides further study on the human body structure and its functions. Covers advanced principles of the cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, excretory (urinary), endocrine, and reproductive (male and female) systems. Develops advanced understanding of the interrelationships among systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis. Includes lecture and laboratory components.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 220 (Anatomy and Physiology I)

One additional science course from the following:

BIO 230 Microbiology (4 credits)
Introduces the study of Microbiology. Examines microbes such as bacteria, viruses, protozoa and fungi and their impact on humans and on the environment. The laboratory portion covers lab techniques including proper use of microscopes, staining, aseptic technique, and the process of scientific experimentation, recording data, and analysis.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 110 (Biology I: Molecular and Cells)

CHE 107 Fundamentals of Chemistry (3 credits)
Introduces the fundamental concepts of chemistry. Covers topics including include atomic structure, periodic table, bonding, various states of matter, nomenclature, chemical reactions, chemical equations, and quantitative relationships.
Prerequisite(s): None

PHY 101 Fundamentals of Physics (4 credits)
Covers the basic principles of physics. Introduces the concepts of Newtonian mechanics, kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, sound and heat applications. Geared to students entering science, health and technology fields. Includes a lab component that provides a hands-on approach to physical phenomena. Experiments focus on core physics concepts of mechanics: force, motion, conservation laws, and oscillations.
Prerequisite(s): MAT 121 (College Algebra) or equivalent

One elective course from the following:

BIO 115 Medical Terminology (3 credits)
Introduces the language and terminology of the medical field. Explores how medical terms are constructed and used within the field. Discusses how to define, interpret, and translate medical terms as they appear in medical documentation and records.
Prerequisite(s): None

BIO 265 Nutrition (3 credits)
Provides an overview to the study of nutrition and food science. Discusses nutrients, other food substances, food sources, food interactions, and balanced diets as they relate to healthy living and well-being. Covers the importance of nutrition and its connection to healthy body function.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 220 (Anatomy and Physiology I)

BIO 301 Psychobiology (3 credits)
Focuses on the relationship between biological and psychological phenomena (i.e., the mind-body connection). Explores the genetic foundations, developmental processes, and neurobiological systems that underlie and influence behavior, cognition, emotion, motivation, learning, memory, vision, sensation, and movement. Develops an appreciation for the reciprocal relationship between psychological experiences and environment and neurological development and brain functioning. Also studies the various illnesses and disabilities that occur when biological and psychological processes go awry and how knowledge of psychobiology can contribute to diagnosis and important treatment decisions.
Credit given for BIO 301 or PSY 378
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 280 Human Growth and Development (3 credits)
Provides students with a broad knowledge and understanding of the field of developmental psychology. Emphasizes major theories, perspectives and associated research as they relate to the physical, cognitive and psychosocial aspects of development from conception through the end of life. Examines typical growth and development patterns as well as factors that lead to disruption and change in those patterns. Students will develop insight into the factors that make people the way they are and how to support healthy human growth and development.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

PSY 360 Abnormal Psychology (3 credits)
Presents an in-depth review of the historical and philosophical foundations of abnormal psychology and psychopathology, as well as the development of classification systems for mental disorders and its implication for diagnosis and treatment. Discusses the integrated roles of biology, psychology and social context, issues related to assessment, legal considerations and the role of ethics and morality.
Prerequisite(s): PSY 101 (Introduction to Psychology)

STA 201 Introduction to Statistics (3 credits)
Develops an understanding of statistical methodology and use of critical judgment in analyzing data sets. Includes descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency, introduction to probability, both normal and binomial distributions, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, linear regression, and correlation. Emphasizes developing the practical skills of interpreting and reporting descriptive and inferential univariate and bivariate statistical information.
Prerequisite(s): None

A minor in Graphic Design teaches students design concepts through print and web-based lessons and projects. Students are prepared for careers in visual communication and graphic design.

Required courses:

ART 120 Introduction to Adobe Creative Suite (3 credits)
Introduces the core software suite of Adobe Creative Cloud, including Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. Emphasizes the development of a working knowledge of the software tools and how they integrate with each other. Focuses on selecting programs to use for design objectives and integrating the programs together.
Prerequisite(s): None

ART 150 Foundations of Design 1 (3 credits)
Introduces the visual components that serve as fundamental principles in the field of design. Discusses the study, classification, and application of Gestalt theories of perception, color systems for designers, and pattern making. Covers design methodology, processes, and language; the critique process; project workflow; and professional practices and presentation. Explores art history to develop knowledge of art concepts, vocabulary, color theory, and composition.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ART 120 (Introduction to Adobe Creative Suite)

ART 220 Computer Graphic Design I (3 credits)
Introduces the principles of visual communication design, graphic design, page layout and typography. Covers design elements and design solutions for the projects presented and explored through the various projects, with an emphasis on typography and layout. Emphasizes the use visual vocabulary and the application of design theory. Introduces procedures of client-designer relationships and the process of design creation. Design history and print production are emphasized.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ART 120 (Introduction to Adobe Creative Suite)

ART 230 Digital Multimedia I (3 credits)
Introduces vector-based software solutions to create illustrations, use of typography design principles, logos, and incorporation of images within graphics. Utilizes logos, icons, and illustrations as means to master vector illustration. Presents strategies, concepts, and illustration techniques used by digital designers and illustrators. Examines graphics design as both isolated elements and cohesive projects for print and web using Adobe Illustrator software.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ART 120 (Introduction to Adobe Creative Suite) and ART 220 (Computer Graphic Design I)

ART 320 Computer Graphic Design II (3 credits)
Discusses in depth application of digital images in the world of graphic design. Applies design principles to sophisticated projects reflecting current design trends.
Prerequisite(s): ART 220 (Computer Graphic Design I)

ART 330 Digital Multimedia II (3 credits)
Provides an in-depth study of design solutions and builds on previous knowledge designing materials for business such as logos, branding, corporate identity and brochures. Emphasizes the Adobe workflow with a concentration on InDesign and Photoshop.
Prerequisite(s): ART 220 (Computer Graphic Design I) and ART 230 (Digital Multimedia I)

ART 420 Advanced Design Studio I (3 credits)
Provides a thorough melding of professional design skills with real-world design projects with an emphasis on conceptual thinking, mechanical techniques and expanding the student’s visual vocabulary.
Prerequisite(s): ART 220 (Computer Graphic Design I) and ART 230 (Digital Multimedia I)
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ART 320 (Computer Graphic Design II) and ART 330 (Digital Multimedia II)

ART 440 Advanced Design Studio II (3 credits)
Expands upon the advanced design concepts of ART 420 and utilizes the opportunity to work with real world clientele to create corporate brand identity designs including all of the required graphics. Uses instructor direction and peer review to refine usage of the design principles covered in the previous classes, creating professional level designs.
Prerequisite(s): ART 420 (Advanced Design Studio)

ART 466 Senior Portfolio (1 credit)
Facilitates the building of a portfolio website using the best of the students work to date. Involves perfecting and rebuilding past projects. Emphasizes knowledge of portfolio website development. Requires students complete additional advanced design projects for their portfolio.
Prerequisite(s): ART 420 (Advanced Design Studio)

A minor in Graphic Design teaches students design concepts through print and web-based lessons and projects. Students are prepared for careers in visual communication and graphic design.

Required courses:

ART 120 Introduction to Adobe Creative Suite (3 credits)
Introduces the core software suite of Adobe Creative Cloud, including Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. Emphasizes the development of a working knowledge of the software tools and how they integrate with each other. Focuses on selecting programs to use for design objectives and integrating the programs together.
Prerequisite(s): None

ART 150 Foundations of Design 1 (3 credits)
Introduces the visual components that serve as fundamental principles in the field of design. Discusses the study, classification, and application of Gestalt theories of perception, color systems for designers, and pattern making. Covers design methodology, processes, and language; the critique process; project workflow; and professional practices and presentation. Explores art history to develop knowledge of art concepts, vocabulary, color theory, and composition.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ART 120 (Introduction to Adobe Creative Suite)

ART 220 Computer Graphic Design I (3 credits)
Introduces the principles of visual communication design, graphic design, page layout and typography. Covers design elements and design solutions for the projects presented and explored through the various projects, with an emphasis on typography and layout. Emphasizes the use visual vocabulary and the application of design theory. Introduces procedures of client-designer relationships and the process of design creation. Design history and print production are emphasized.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ART 120 (Introduction to Adobe Creative Suite)

ART 230 Digital Multimedia I (3 credits)
Introduces vector-based software solutions to create illustrations, use of typography design principles, logos, and incorporation of images within graphics. Utilizes logos, icons, and illustrations as means to master vector illustration. Presents strategies, concepts, and illustration techniques used by digital designers and illustrators. Examines graphics design as both isolated elements and cohesive projects for print and web using Adobe Illustrator software.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ART 120 (Introduction to Adobe Creative Suite) and ART 220 (Computer Graphic Design I)

ART 320 Computer Graphic Design II (3 credits)
Discusses in depth application of digital images in the world of graphic design. Applies design principles to sophisticated projects reflecting current design trends.
Prerequisite(s): ART 220 (Computer Graphic Design I)

ART 330 Digital Multimedia II (3 credits)
Provides an in-depth study of design solutions and builds on previous knowledge designing materials for business such as logos, branding, corporate identity and brochures. Emphasizes the Adobe workflow with a concentration on InDesign and Photoshop.
Prerequisite(s): ART 220 (Computer Graphic Design I) and ART 230 (Digital Multimedia I)

ART 420 Advanced Design Studio I (3 credits)
Provides a thorough melding of professional design skills with real-world design projects with an emphasis on conceptual thinking, mechanical techniques and expanding the student’s visual vocabulary.
Prerequisite(s): ART 220 (Computer Graphic Design I) and ART 230 (Digital Multimedia I)
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): ART 320 (Computer Graphic Design II) and ART 330 (Digital Multimedia II)

ART 440 Advanced Design Studio II (3 credits)
Expands upon the advanced design concepts of ART 420 and utilizes the opportunity to work with real world clientele to create corporate brand identity designs including all of the required graphics. Uses instructor direction and peer review to refine usage of the design principles covered in the previous classes, creating professional level designs.
Prerequisite(s): ART 420 (Advanced Design Studio)

ART 466 Senior Portfolio (1 credit)
Facilitates the building of a portfolio website using the best of the students work to date. Involves perfecting and rebuilding past projects. Emphasizes knowledge of portfolio website development. Requires students complete additional advanced design projects for their portfolio.
Prerequisite(s): ART 420 (Advanced Design Studio)

MINOR IN EDUCATION

A minor in Education gives exposure to theories and techniques which enhance the classroom teaching experience. A strong foundation in education also combines well with continued studies in graphic design or psychology.

Required core course:

EDU 101 Foundations of Teaching and Learning (3 credits)
Introduces the teaching profession and the important elements of effective teaching. Explores historical foundations and contemporary trends in education, educational philosophy. Covers concepts such as curricular methods and patterns, and educational theories such as multiple intelligences (Armstrong), brain-based learning (Caine and Caine), and dimensions of learning (Marzanno). Presents required components of effective lesson planning, including the development of effective learning objectives and selection of instructional strategies. Discusses contemporary challenges in education and expectations with regards to professionalism and the role of the teacher. Requires participation and observation of an actual classroom.
Prerequisite(s): None

Five elective courses from the following are required:

EDU 265 Integrating Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Introduces the theories and techniques of educational technology. Discuses use of technology to improve learning, motivation, engagement, assessment, self-assessment, and classroom management in traditional classrooms, hybrid classrooms, and distance learning environments.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): EDU 101 (Foundations of Teaching and Learning)

EDU 270 Education: Theory and Practice (3 credits)
Surveys the basic theories of learning and teaching and the application of theory to educational environments. Examines the adaptation of the concepts of behavioral, cognitive, and constructivist learning theories to teaching and managing an effective learning environment. Emphasizes the principles of motivation, classroom management, and assessment of student performance.
Prerequisite(s): None

EDU 320 Instructional Design (3 credits)
Emphasizes the use of formative, summative, and non-traditional assessments in the classroom. Introduces the principles of curriculum design that align learning objectives, instructional strategies, and assessment strategies. Focuses on the use of authentic assessment to evaluate student mastery. Topics also include assuring inclusion of special needs students in curriculum planning and using effectives communication techniques with parents, support systems, and the learning community.
Prerequisite(s): EDU 101 (Foundations of Teaching and Learning)

EDU 360 Classroom Techniques and Management (3 credits)
Introduces strategies for developing and maintaining effective classroom management. Focuses on the essential components of classroom management, including classroom structure, limit-setting, responsibility training, and back-up systems. Intended for students interested in teaching.
Prerequisite(s): None

EDU 406 Independent Study in Education (3 credits)
Provides an opportunity to develop advanced knowledge in the field of education and examine an area of interest related to education and/or delivery of educational programs. May involve the completion of independent research or an in-depth project related to the field of education. Enrollment requires development of a written independent study proposal and pre-approval of the Academic Dean. Limited to a maximum of 6 credits over the course of the degree.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing in the education major or minor; Minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in the major or minor

EDU 415 Differentiated Instruction (3 credits)
Introduces the principles of differentiated instruction, including reading across the curriculum, implementation of individualized education plans (IEPs) in the general education classroom, and teaching through different modalities. Focuses on effective co-teaching, universal design for learning, formative and summative assessment, and response to intervention/multi-tiered systems of support.
Credit given for PSY 381 or EDU 415
Prerequisite(s): PSY 383 (Survey of Exceptional Children)

EDU 450 Practicum in Jewish Education I (3 credits)
Supervised professional experience in the field. Student will be paired with a mentor who will advise the student throughout the practicum. The student will engage in self-reflection and self-evaluation. The practicum is designed to create a community of practice and will include group meetings and peer observation.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): EDU 101 (Foundations of Teaching and Learning) or equivalent

EDU 451 Practicum in Jewish Education II (3 credits)
Continues the supervised classroom experience for practical application and implementation of educational theories and methods for teaching Jewish studies. Topics include: lesson planning, curriculum design and implementation, classroom management, communication skills.
Prerequisite(s): EDU 450 (Practicum in Jewish Education I)

EDU 490 Student Teaching (3 credits)
Provides a clinical experience that exposes students to all dimensions of teaching and learning. Requires a 15-week school placement where students apply knowledge and skills in a K-12 learning environment. Affords direct experience in delivering instruction and managing a classroom under the guidance of a mentor teacher.
Prerequisite(s): EDU 101 (Foundations of Teaching and Learning) or EDU 270 (Education: Theory and Practice) or equivalent

EDU 498 Internship in Education (1-3 credits)
Provides opportunity for exploration of the field of education in a professional setting. Allows students to integrate theory and practice and engage in a team-based work environment. Requires completion of 45-135 clock hours under the supervision of an education professional. Requires a special application.
Prerequisite(s): Jewish education major or education minor with junior standing or higher

EDU 499 Internship in Special Education (1-3 credits)
Provides opportunity for exploration of the field of special education in a professional setting. Allows students to integrate theory and practice and engage in a team-based work environment. Requires completion of 45-135 clock hours under the supervision of a special education professional. Requires a special application.
Prerequisite(s): Jewish education major or education minor with junior standing or higher

Corollary requirement:

COM 101 Fundamentals of Communication (3 credits)
Introduces the principles of effective communication and public speaking. Focuses on processes for constructing an argument, effectively transmitting information, and speaking with confidence. Develops all aspects of delivery, both in formal speeches and interpersonal communication.
Prerequisite(s): None

MINOR IN EDUCATION

A minor in Education gives exposure to theories and techniques which enhance the classroom teaching experience. A strong foundation in education also combines well with continued studies in graphic design or psychology.

Required core course:

EDU 101 Foundations of Teaching and Learning (3 credits)
Introduces the teaching profession and the important elements of effective teaching. Explores historical foundations and contemporary trends in education, educational philosophy. Covers concepts such as curricular methods and patterns, and educational theories such as multiple intelligences (Armstrong), brain-based learning (Caine and Caine), and dimensions of learning (Marzanno). Presents required components of effective lesson planning, including the development of effective learning objectives and selection of instructional strategies. Discusses contemporary challenges in education and expectations with regards to professionalism and the role of the teacher. Requires participation and observation of an actual classroom.
Prerequisite(s): None

Five elective courses from the following are required:

EDU 265 Integrating Technology in the Classroom (3 credits)
Introduces the theories and techniques of educational technology. Discuses use of technology to improve learning, motivation, engagement, assessment, self-assessment, and classroom management in traditional classrooms, hybrid classrooms, and distance learning environments.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): EDU 101 (Foundations of Teaching and Learning)

EDU 270 Education: Theory and Practice (3 credits)
Surveys the basic theories of learning and teaching and the application of theory to educational environments. Examines the adaptation of the concepts of behavioral, cognitive, and constructivist learning theories to teaching and managing an effective learning environment. Emphasizes the principles of motivation, classroom management, and assessment of student performance.
Prerequisite(s): None

EDU 320 Instructional Design (3 credits)
Emphasizes the use of formative, summative, and non-traditional assessments in the classroom. Introduces the principles of curriculum design that align learning objectives, instructional strategies, and assessment strategies. Focuses on the use of authentic assessment to evaluate student mastery. Topics also include assuring inclusion of special needs students in curriculum planning and using effectives communication techniques with parents, support systems, and the learning community.
Prerequisite(s): EDU 101 (Foundations of Teaching and Learning)

EDU 360 Classroom Techniques and Management (3 credits)
Introduces strategies for developing and maintaining effective classroom management. Focuses on the essential components of classroom management, including classroom structure, limit-setting, responsibility training, and back-up systems. Intended for students interested in teaching.
Prerequisite(s): None

EDU 406 Independent Study in Education (3 credits)
Provides an opportunity to develop advanced knowledge in the field of education and examine an area of interest related to education and/or delivery of educational programs. May involve the completion of independent research or an in-depth project related to the field of education. Enrollment requires development of a written independent study proposal and pre-approval of the Academic Dean. Limited to a maximum of 6 credits over the course of the degree.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing in the education major or minor; Minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in the major or minor

EDU 415 Differentiated Instruction (3 credits)
Introduces the principles of differentiated instruction, including reading across the curriculum, implementation of individualized education plans (IEPs) in the general education classroom, and teaching through different modalities. Focuses on effective co-teaching, universal design for learning, formative and summative assessment, and response to intervention/multi-tiered systems of support.
Credit given for PSY 381 or EDU 415
Prerequisite(s): PSY 383 (Survey of Exceptional Children)

EDU 450 Practicum in Jewish Education I (3 credits)
Supervised professional experience in the field. Student will be paired with a mentor who will advise the student throughout the practicum. The student will engage in self-reflection and self-evaluation. The practicum is designed to create a community of practice and will include group meetings and peer observation.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): EDU 101 (Foundations of Teaching and Learning) or equivalent

EDU 451 Practicum in Jewish Education II (3 credits)
Continues the supervised classroom experience for practical application and implementation of educational theories and methods for teaching Jewish studies. Topics include: lesson planning, curriculum design and implementation, classroom management, communication skills.
Prerequisite(s): EDU 450 (Practicum in Jewish Education I)

EDU 490 Student Teaching (3 credits)
Provides a clinical experience that exposes students to all dimensions of teaching and learning. Requires a 15-week school placement where students apply knowledge and skills in a K-12 learning environment. Affords direct experience in delivering instruction and managing a classroom under the guidance of a mentor teacher.
Prerequisite(s): EDU 101 (Foundations of Teaching and Learning) or EDU 270 (Education: Theory and Practice) or equivalent

EDU 498 Internship in Education (1-3 credits)
Provides opportunity for exploration of the field of education in a professional setting. Allows students to integrate theory and practice and engage in a team-based work environment. Requires completion of 45-135 clock hours under the supervision of an education professional. Requires a special application.
Prerequisite(s): Jewish education major or education minor with junior standing or higher

EDU 499 Internship in Special Education (1-3 credits)
Provides opportunity for exploration of the field of special education in a professional setting. Allows students to integrate theory and practice and engage in a team-based work environment. Requires completion of 45-135 clock hours under the supervision of a special education professional. Requires a special application.
Prerequisite(s): Jewish education major or education minor with junior standing or higher

Corollary requirement:

COM 101 Fundamentals of Communication (3 credits)
Introduces the principles of effective communication and public speaking. Focuses on processes for constructing an argument, effectively transmitting information, and speaking with confidence. Develops all aspects of delivery, both in formal speeches and interpersonal communication.
Prerequisite(s): None

A minor in Jewish Studies offer students the opportunity to study a full array of Judaic courses encompassing Biblical texts and literature, philosophy, law, customs and ethics. This study is beneficial for those pursuing careers in Jewish Education and Jewish communal service and provides values-based study that can enhance any career area.

Six courses, in at least two subject areas, from the following:

BIB 102 Textual Studies in Bible (3 credits)
Focuses on building Jewish studies text analysis skills. Utilizes the chavrusa method of study, where students work in pairs and use guided study sheets to decode texts and generate questions. Explores the text thematically, using relevant commentaries in search of answers to textual and philosophical difficulties. Discusses an analysis of the text’s relevance to contemporary Jewish life. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (BIB 102A and BIB 102B).
Prerequisite(s): None

BIB 325 Living Tehillim in Challenging Times (3 credits)
Discusses the various songs of Tehillim and explores the psychological, theological and historical elements that are found in each individual (psalm) song. Explores how to connect to the diversity of raw emotions portrayed in the text and discover the therapeutic function and tools in the psalm. Discusses the psychological and theological elements of each song and how to integrate them into one’s personal and professional life. Delves into the mystical Hebrew Alphabet to see the significance of King David’s alphabetizing the verses of his longest psalm, #119.
Credit given for PSY 115 or BIB 325
Prerequisite(s): None

BIB 360 Megillas Shir HaShirim (3 credits)
Explores the literal meaning and the metaphorical interpretations of the Megillah. Focuses largely on the commentary of the Alshich, who views the Megillah as essential to appreciating the relationship between Hashem and the Jewish people. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (BIB 360A and BIB 360B).
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

BIB 375 Megillas Esther (3 credits)
Explores Megillas Esther through the lens of Gemaros, Midrashim, classical meforshim, and contemporary Baalei Mussar. Emphasizes analysis of Megilas Esther as the “Handbook of Galus” for Klal Yisroel. Connects the Halachos of Purim to the text of the Megilla. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (BIB 375A and BIB 375B).
Prerequisite(s): None

BIB 395 Women in the Bible I (3 credits)
Focuses on paradigmatic women in the Bible according to Aishes Chayil. Emphasis is on their roles and impact on Jewish thought and life.
Prerequisite(s): None

BIB 400 Women in the Bible II (3 credits)
Continues advanced study and textual analysis of significant women in Biblical literature, focusing on their qualities as expressed in Proverbs chapter 31 and their subsequent influence on Jewish thought and society.
Prerequisite(s): None

BIB 410 Unique Women in Tanach (3 credits)
Focuses on lesser known women in Tanach. Uses text analysis to explore all the סוגיות in תנ''ך (topics in the Bible) in which these women are found. Analyzes the lives of the women through classical and contemporary מפרשים to gain a deeper understanding of the פנימיות (essence) of these women. Evaluates how theirנסיונות (trials) and achievements impacted their own lives and the future of כלל ישראל (the Jewish people). May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JST 410A and JST 410B.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

BIB 420 Exile to Redemption: History of the Jews at the End of the First Temple Era (3 credits)
Examines chapters in Sefer Yechezkel pre-Churban and post-Churban. Investigates numerous sources in Tanach, Torah Sh'baal Peh, Rishonim, and Achronim to illuminate the historical and social context of each nevuah. Emphasizes relevance to contemporary life. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (BIB 420A and BIB 420B).
Prerequisite(s): None

ETH 325 Tomer Devora: Pathways to Ethical Living (3 credits)
Explores the development of compassion as exemplified by G-d’s compassionate acts towards the Jewish People. Delves into the Tomer Devora by Rabbi Moshe Cordovero, which examines G-d’s thirteen attributes of rachamim. Explores ways of emulating G-d’s attributes to improve one’s character, live ethically, and enhance interpersonal relationships. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (ETH 325A and ETH 325B).
Prerequisite(s): None

ETH 337 Business Ethics and Jewish Law (3 credits)
Studies Jewish law as it relates to the world of commerce and business and its application to modern situations. Focuses on classical halachic literature, including Talmud and related commentaries. Explores the ethical principles that govern conduct in the world of commerce. Emphasis is placed on common ethical questions and the practical application of Jewish moral principles to the business world. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (ETH 337A and ETH 337B).
Formerly RAB 337 (Jewish Law: Economics and Business Ethics)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

ETH 390 Ethical Interpersonal Communication (3 credits)
Studies the Jewish laws of interpersonal communication. Emphasizes the laws of speech drawing from the Chofetz Chaim, Gemara, Medrashim, Rambam, Rabeinu Yona, and other Rishonim and Acharonim.
Formerly JST 390 (Ethical Interpersonal Communication)
Prerequisite(s): None

ETH 466 Medical Ethics and Jewish Law (3 credits)
Discusses the structure and development of Jewish ethics and halacha (law) connected to the fields of health and medicine. Explores the development of medical ethics and the evolution of halacha related to medicine. Covers the Jewish approach to health and healing and major ethical issues and debates that arise in the field of medicine. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (ETH 466A and ETH 466B).
Formerly JST 466 (Judaism in Medicine: History, Ethics and Halacha)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

HIS 315 Jews and Christians in Renaissance Europe (3 credits)
Explores the lives of Jews and Christians in Renaissance Europe with a focus on arenas of interaction and inclusion, as well as early modern modes of exclusion, isolation, and religious persecution. Studies religious life, economic and cultural change and development, women and family life, and Renaissance education. Introduces sources and methods of historical research, while fostering critical reading, analysis, and writing skills.
Prerequisite(s): None

HIS 337 History of the Jewish Community in the Land of Israel (3 credits)
Surveys Jewish history from Gaonic through early modern times and connections to the rise of Zionism and growth of Jewish communities in Israel. Discusses the origins of the modern Zionist movement within the context of ideological movements in 18th-20th century Europe. Covers the Old Yishuv, early Aliyah movements, and differing rabbinic responses to early Zionism. Focuses on the shift from life under the British mandate to the establishment of the State of Israel. Introduces key personalities in Jewish life in Palestine and Israel, forms of Jewish resistance, and early Arab resistance. Explores recent Israeli history and the Arab-Israeli conflict until the present. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (HIS 337A and HIS 337B).
Prerequisite(s): None

HIS 340 Women in Jewish History and Culture (3 credits)
Investigates the lives of Jewish women from early modern times until today and examines the influence of gender upon experiences. Focuses on the four major themes of women’s daily lives, women’s participation in the economy and public sphere, women’s religious lives, and women’s family lives. Introduces sources and methods of historical research, while fostering critical reading, thinking, and writing skills.
Prerequisite(s): None

HIS 420 Exile to Redemption: History of the Jews at the End of the First Temple Era (3 credits)
Examines chapters in Sefer Yechezkel pre-Churban and post-Churban. Investigates numerous sources in Tanach, Torah Sh'baal Peh, Rishonim and Achronim to illuminate the historical and social context of each nevuah. Emphasizes relevance to contemporary life. May be offered as separate courses of 1.5 credit hour each (HIS 420A and HIS 420B)
Credit given for HIS 420 or BIB 420
Prerequisite(s): None

JLW 331 Jewish Law: Dietary Law (3 credits)
Examines the laws of kashrus (dietary laws) using classical and contemporary sources. Explores how technology has impacted kashrus observance. Discusses practical laws relevant to the kosher kitchen. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JLW 331A and JLW 331B).
Formerly RAB 331 Jewish Law: Dietary Law
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JLW 332 Jewish Law: Blessings (3 credits)
Examines the concepts and different types of brachos (blessings). Covers the laws of brachos and their correct usage based on classical and contemporary sources. Investigates daily brachos, such as those said over food, as well as brachos related to mitzvos and special occasions. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JLW 332A and JLW 332B).
Formerly RAB 332 (Jewish Law: Blessings)
Prerequisite(s): None

JLT 329 Challenging Concepts in Tanach and Midrash (3 credits)
Focuses on creative exploration of Biblical and rabbinic texts and how to develop an overarching thematic ‘’panorama’’ of narratives which is both compelling and inspiring. Discusses the difference between authoritative derash versus speculative homiletics, and how to trace scriptural and midrashic patterns to corroborate the truth of an idea. Explores ways to interact with text that are both academically rigorous and emotionally inspiring, stimulating the heart along with the mind.
Prerequisite(s): None

JLT 385 Nature’s Song: Studies in Perek Shira (3 credits)
Studies the first chapter of Perek Shira. Explores the majesty of nature as expressed in the text of the poem. Examines the timeless messages for personal success and growth encrypted in the poem. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JLT 385A and JLT 385B).
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JLT 480 Jewish Holidays in Biblical and Talmudic Literature (3 credits)
Examines sources in Chumash which discuss Jewish holidays with the aim of developing a deeper understanding of the meaning of the holidays. Analyzes the text of the Chumash and differences in the language used in various locations to discuss holidays. Utilizes traditional and modern commentaries to widen understanding of the messages of the Chumash for observance of the holidays, and how these messages can be used to enhance holiday experiences. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JLT 480A and JLT 480B).
Formerly BIB 480 (Jewish Holidays in Biblical and Talmudic Literature)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JPH 350 Letters Through the Ages (3 credits)
Examines letters of gedolim from the early Rishonim to the late Achronim with the aim of gaining insight into the lives and teachings of great Jewish leaders. Explores angles and insights not usually exposed through their classic writings. Analyzes philosophical and hashkafic ideas as they relate to the individual and Klal Yisrael’s destiny as a whole, with an emphasis on relevance to daily living. Analyzes the different writing styles of rabbinic and poetic Hebrew. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JPH 350A and JPH 350B).
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JPH 378 Writings of the Maharal (3 credits)
Studies the writings of the Maharal, particularly the Be'er HaGolah. In the Be'er HaGolah the Maharal presents a comprehensive picture of the role of Chazal and of their methodology. Written as a defense of Chazal, it produces an awe-inspiring appreciation of the depth of their teachings
Formerly JST 378 (Writings of the Maharal of Prague)
Prerequisite(s): None

JPH 400 Jewish Philosophy: Rambam’s Thirteen Principles I (3 credits)
Discusses the concepts of Rambam’s (Maimonides) Thirteen Principles of Faith from his own writings and as expounded by Rishonim and Acharonim with sources drawn from Gemara and Midrashim. Emphasizes application of the thirteen principles to everyday life. Focuses on the first five of the Thirteen Principles of Faith.
Formerly JST 400 (Jewish Philosophy: Rambam’s Thirteen Principles I)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JPH 401 Jewish Philosophy: Rambam’s Thirteen Principles II (3 credits)
Discusses the concepts of Rambam’s (Maimonides) Thirteen Principles of Faith from his own writings and as expounded by Rishonim and Acharonim with sources drawn from Gemara and Midrashim. Emphasizes application of the thirteen principles to everyday life. Focuses on principles six through thirteen of the Thirteen Principles of Faith.
Formerly JST 401 (Jewish Philosophy: Rambam’s Thirteen Principles II)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JPH 412 The Life and Works of Ramchal (3 credits)
Examines the life of Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzatto, the Ramchal, and the time period in which he lived. Explores the works of machshava he wrote in his life within their historical context. Studies “Derech Hashem,” which is his great and influential work of Jewish philosophy, theology, and spirituality. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JPH 412A and JPH 412B).
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JST 411 Topics in Chassidic Thought (3 credits)
Explores the content, substance, and spirit of Chassidic thought and life. Examines the history of the Chassidic movement within the context of modern Jewish history. Studies the lives of Chassidic masters. Engages in in-depth textual study of the seminal writing of Chassidic masters and application of those ideas to contemporary life. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JST 411A and JST 411B).
Prerequisite(s): None

JST 415 Women in the World (3 credits)
Discusses the areas of Jewish law commonly encountered in the professional world. Examines laws relevant to a Jewish woman in the workplace. Explores the Jewish outlook towards interfacing with the secular world in various circumstances. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JST 415A and JST 415B).
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JST 420 Avodas HaLev: Fundamentals of Prayer (3 credits)
Explores the nature, power, and art of Jewish prayer and the challenges to effective prayer. Traces the historical development of formal prayer, including its structure. Examines texts of prayer to understand the concepts of prayer and how to make prayer meaningful. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JST 420A and JST 420B).
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JST 478 Feminism and Jewish Perspectives of Women (3 credits)
Explores the history of feminism. Analyzes the Feminist Movement’s interface with traditional Judaism. Investigates the social position of women in the Bible and throughout history. Examines modesty, love, differences between the sexes, marriage, family purity, motherhood and career, sexuality, divorce and widowhood, mitzvah observance, and women and Jewish law. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JST 478A and JST 478B).
Prerequisite(s): None

JST 493 Jewish Studies Thesis (3 credits)
Expands Jewish studies knowledge and skills through a guided independent research project. Requires selection of an area of interest within the field of Jewish studies, or a combination of the chosen field with Jewish studies. Involves research leading to a major research paper, creative project, or applied project.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 (English Composition 1)

A minor in Jewish Studies offer students the opportunity to study a full array of Judaic courses encompassing Biblical texts and literature, philosophy, law, customs and ethics. This study is beneficial for those pursuing careers in Jewish Education and Jewish communal service and provides values-based study that can enhance any career area.

Six courses, in at least two subject areas, from the following:

BIB 102 Textual Studies in Bible (3 credits)
Focuses on building Jewish studies text analysis skills. Utilizes the chavrusa method of study, where students work in pairs and use guided study sheets to decode texts and generate questions. Explores the text thematically, using relevant commentaries in search of answers to textual and philosophical difficulties. Discusses an analysis of the text’s relevance to contemporary Jewish life. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (BIB 102A and BIB 102B).
Prerequisite(s): None

BIB 325 Living Tehillim in Challenging Times (3 credits)
Discusses the various songs of Tehillim and explores the psychological, theological and historical elements that are found in each individual (psalm) song. Explores how to connect to the diversity of raw emotions portrayed in the text and discover the therapeutic function and tools in the psalm. Discusses the psychological and theological elements of each song and how to integrate them into one’s personal and professional life. Delves into the mystical Hebrew Alphabet to see the significance of King David’s alphabetizing the verses of his longest psalm, #119.
Credit given for PSY 115 or BIB 325
Prerequisite(s): None

BIB 360 Megillas Shir HaShirim (3 credits)
Explores the literal meaning and the metaphorical interpretations of the Megillah. Focuses largely on the commentary of the Alshich, who views the Megillah as essential to appreciating the relationship between Hashem and the Jewish people. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (BIB 360A and BIB 360B).
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

BIB 375 Megillas Esther (3 credits)
Explores Megillas Esther through the lens of Gemaros, Midrashim, classical meforshim, and contemporary Baalei Mussar. Emphasizes analysis of Megilas Esther as the “Handbook of Galus” for Klal Yisroel. Connects the Halachos of Purim to the text of the Megilla. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (BIB 375A and BIB 375B).
Prerequisite(s): None

BIB 395 Women in the Bible I (3 credits)
Focuses on paradigmatic women in the Bible according to Aishes Chayil. Emphasis is on their roles and impact on Jewish thought and life.
Prerequisite(s): None

BIB 400 Women in the Bible II (3 credits)
Continues advanced study and textual analysis of significant women in Biblical literature, focusing on their qualities as expressed in Proverbs chapter 31 and their subsequent influence on Jewish thought and society.
Prerequisite(s): None

BIB 410 Unique Women in Tanach (3 credits)
Focuses on lesser known women in Tanach. Uses text analysis to explore all the סוגיות in תנ''ך (topics in the Bible) in which these women are found. Analyzes the lives of the women through classical and contemporary מפרשים to gain a deeper understanding of the פנימיות (essence) of these women. Evaluates how theirנסיונות (trials) and achievements impacted their own lives and the future of כלל ישראל (the Jewish people). May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JST 410A and JST 410B.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

BIB 420 Exile to Redemption: History of the Jews at the End of the First Temple Era (3 credits)
Examines chapters in Sefer Yechezkel pre-Churban and post-Churban. Investigates numerous sources in Tanach, Torah Sh'baal Peh, Rishonim, and Achronim to illuminate the historical and social context of each nevuah. Emphasizes relevance to contemporary life. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (BIB 420A and BIB 420B).
Prerequisite(s): None

ETH 325 Tomer Devora: Pathways to Ethical Living (3 credits)
Explores the development of compassion as exemplified by G-d’s compassionate acts towards the Jewish People. Delves into the Tomer Devora by Rabbi Moshe Cordovero, which examines G-d’s thirteen attributes of rachamim. Explores ways of emulating G-d’s attributes to improve one’s character, live ethically, and enhance interpersonal relationships. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (ETH 325A and ETH 325B).
Prerequisite(s): None

ETH 337 Business Ethics and Jewish Law (3 credits)
Studies Jewish law as it relates to the world of commerce and business and its application to modern situations. Focuses on classical halachic literature, including Talmud and related commentaries. Explores the ethical principles that govern conduct in the world of commerce. Emphasis is placed on common ethical questions and the practical application of Jewish moral principles to the business world. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (ETH 337A and ETH 337B).
Formerly RAB 337 (Jewish Law: Economics and Business Ethics)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

ETH 390 Ethical Interpersonal Communication (3 credits)
Studies the Jewish laws of interpersonal communication. Emphasizes the laws of speech drawing from the Chofetz Chaim, Gemara, Medrashim, Rambam, Rabeinu Yona, and other Rishonim and Acharonim.
Formerly JST 390 (Ethical Interpersonal Communication)
Prerequisite(s): None

ETH 466 Medical Ethics and Jewish Law (3 credits)
Discusses the structure and development of Jewish ethics and halacha (law) connected to the fields of health and medicine. Explores the development of medical ethics and the evolution of halacha related to medicine. Covers the Jewish approach to health and healing and major ethical issues and debates that arise in the field of medicine. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (ETH 466A and ETH 466B).
Formerly JST 466 (Judaism in Medicine: History, Ethics and Halacha)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

HIS 315 Jews and Christians in Renaissance Europe (3 credits)
Explores the lives of Jews and Christians in Renaissance Europe with a focus on arenas of interaction and inclusion, as well as early modern modes of exclusion, isolation, and religious persecution. Studies religious life, economic and cultural change and development, women and family life, and Renaissance education. Introduces sources and methods of historical research, while fostering critical reading, analysis, and writing skills.
Prerequisite(s): None

HIS 337 History of the Jewish Community in the Land of Israel (3 credits)
Surveys Jewish history from Gaonic through early modern times and connections to the rise of Zionism and growth of Jewish communities in Israel. Discusses the origins of the modern Zionist movement within the context of ideological movements in 18th-20th century Europe. Covers the Old Yishuv, early Aliyah movements, and differing rabbinic responses to early Zionism. Focuses on the shift from life under the British mandate to the establishment of the State of Israel. Introduces key personalities in Jewish life in Palestine and Israel, forms of Jewish resistance, and early Arab resistance. Explores recent Israeli history and the Arab-Israeli conflict until the present. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (HIS 337A and HIS 337B).
Prerequisite(s): None

HIS 340 Women in Jewish History and Culture (3 credits)
Investigates the lives of Jewish women from early modern times until today and examines the influence of gender upon experiences. Focuses on the four major themes of women’s daily lives, women’s participation in the economy and public sphere, women’s religious lives, and women’s family lives. Introduces sources and methods of historical research, while fostering critical reading, thinking, and writing skills.
Prerequisite(s): None

HIS 420 Exile to Redemption: History of the Jews at the End of the First Temple Era (3 credits)
Examines chapters in Sefer Yechezkel pre-Churban and post-Churban. Investigates numerous sources in Tanach, Torah Sh'baal Peh, Rishonim and Achronim to illuminate the historical and social context of each nevuah. Emphasizes relevance to contemporary life. May be offered as separate courses of 1.5 credit hour each (HIS 420A and HIS 420B)
Credit given for HIS 420 or BIB 420
Prerequisite(s): None

JLW 331 Jewish Law: Dietary Law (3 credits)
Examines the laws of kashrus (dietary laws) using classical and contemporary sources. Explores how technology has impacted kashrus observance. Discusses practical laws relevant to the kosher kitchen. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JLW 331A and JLW 331B).
Formerly RAB 331 Jewish Law: Dietary Law
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JLW 332 Jewish Law: Blessings (3 credits)
Examines the concepts and different types of brachos (blessings). Covers the laws of brachos and their correct usage based on classical and contemporary sources. Investigates daily brachos, such as those said over food, as well as brachos related to mitzvos and special occasions. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JLW 332A and JLW 332B).
Formerly RAB 332 (Jewish Law: Blessings)
Prerequisite(s): None

JLT 329 Challenging Concepts in Tanach and Midrash (3 credits)
Focuses on creative exploration of Biblical and rabbinic texts and how to develop an overarching thematic ‘’panorama’’ of narratives which is both compelling and inspiring. Discusses the difference between authoritative derash versus speculative homiletics, and how to trace scriptural and midrashic patterns to corroborate the truth of an idea. Explores ways to interact with text that are both academically rigorous and emotionally inspiring, stimulating the heart along with the mind.
Prerequisite(s): None

JLT 385 Nature’s Song: Studies in Perek Shira (3 credits)
Studies the first chapter of Perek Shira. Explores the majesty of nature as expressed in the text of the poem. Examines the timeless messages for personal success and growth encrypted in the poem. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JLT 385A and JLT 385B).
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JLT 480 Jewish Holidays in Biblical and Talmudic Literature (3 credits)
Examines sources in Chumash which discuss Jewish holidays with the aim of developing a deeper understanding of the meaning of the holidays. Analyzes the text of the Chumash and differences in the language used in various locations to discuss holidays. Utilizes traditional and modern commentaries to widen understanding of the messages of the Chumash for observance of the holidays, and how these messages can be used to enhance holiday experiences. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JLT 480A and JLT 480B).
Formerly BIB 480 (Jewish Holidays in Biblical and Talmudic Literature)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JPH 350 Letters Through the Ages (3 credits)
Examines letters of gedolim from the early Rishonim to the late Achronim with the aim of gaining insight into the lives and teachings of great Jewish leaders. Explores angles and insights not usually exposed through their classic writings. Analyzes philosophical and hashkafic ideas as they relate to the individual and Klal Yisrael’s destiny as a whole, with an emphasis on relevance to daily living. Analyzes the different writing styles of rabbinic and poetic Hebrew. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JPH 350A and JPH 350B).
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JPH 378 Writings of the Maharal (3 credits)
Studies the writings of the Maharal, particularly the Be'er HaGolah. In the Be'er HaGolah the Maharal presents a comprehensive picture of the role of Chazal and of their methodology. Written as a defense of Chazal, it produces an awe-inspiring appreciation of the depth of their teachings
Formerly JST 378 (Writings of the Maharal of Prague)
Prerequisite(s): None

JPH 400 Jewish Philosophy: Rambam’s Thirteen Principles I (3 credits)
Discusses the concepts of Rambam’s (Maimonides) Thirteen Principles of Faith from his own writings and as expounded by Rishonim and Acharonim with sources drawn from Gemara and Midrashim. Emphasizes application of the thirteen principles to everyday life. Focuses on the first five of the Thirteen Principles of Faith.
Formerly JST 400 (Jewish Philosophy: Rambam’s Thirteen Principles I)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JPH 401 Jewish Philosophy: Rambam’s Thirteen Principles II (3 credits)
Discusses the concepts of Rambam’s (Maimonides) Thirteen Principles of Faith from his own writings and as expounded by Rishonim and Acharonim with sources drawn from Gemara and Midrashim. Emphasizes application of the thirteen principles to everyday life. Focuses on principles six through thirteen of the Thirteen Principles of Faith.
Formerly JST 401 (Jewish Philosophy: Rambam’s Thirteen Principles II)
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JPH 412 The Life and Works of Ramchal (3 credits)
Examines the life of Rabbi Moshe Chaim Luzatto, the Ramchal, and the time period in which he lived. Explores the works of machshava he wrote in his life within their historical context. Studies “Derech Hashem,” which is his great and influential work of Jewish philosophy, theology, and spirituality. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JPH 412A and JPH 412B).
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JST 411 Topics in Chassidic Thought (3 credits)
Explores the content, substance, and spirit of Chassidic thought and life. Examines the history of the Chassidic movement within the context of modern Jewish history. Studies the lives of Chassidic masters. Engages in in-depth textual study of the seminal writing of Chassidic masters and application of those ideas to contemporary life. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JST 411A and JST 411B).
Prerequisite(s): None

JST 415 Women in the World (3 credits)
Discusses the areas of Jewish law commonly encountered in the professional world. Examines laws relevant to a Jewish woman in the workplace. Explores the Jewish outlook towards interfacing with the secular world in various circumstances. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JST 415A and JST 415B).
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JST 420 Avodas HaLev: Fundamentals of Prayer (3 credits)
Explores the nature, power, and art of Jewish prayer and the challenges to effective prayer. Traces the historical development of formal prayer, including its structure. Examines texts of prayer to understand the concepts of prayer and how to make prayer meaningful. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JST 420A and JST 420B).
Prerequisite(s): Completion of 12 credits of Jewish studies or permission of the Menaheles

JST 478 Feminism and Jewish Perspectives of Women (3 credits)
Explores the history of feminism. Analyzes the Feminist Movement’s interface with traditional Judaism. Investigates the social position of women in the Bible and throughout history. Examines modesty, love, differences between the sexes, marriage, family purity, motherhood and career, sexuality, divorce and widowhood, mitzvah observance, and women and Jewish law. May be offered as two courses of 1.5 credit hour each (JST 478A and JST 478B).
Prerequisite(s): None

JST 493 Jewish Studies Thesis (3 credits)
Expands Jewish studies knowledge and skills through a guided independent research project. Requires selection of an area of interest within the field of Jewish studies, or a combination of the chosen field with Jewish studies. Involves research leading to a major research paper, creative project, or applied project.
Prerequisite(s): ENG 101 (English Composition 1)

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